Kamakura 09.04.2015


Image for Kamakura

It’s quite close to Tokyo (just about 1.5 hours by train) and here is a huge set of Buddhist temples and monasteries. They are located in Kamakura. This is exactly the place we decided to visit. This day weather was just perfect. There was even sunny (:

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Photo 434

The first temple on the road is Hase-dera. In this place there is a huge number of Jizo statues (this is the statues which parents place here in case of their child death or abortion). Since the World War II there was placed more than 50 thousands Jizo statues.

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Photo 435

It’s not just various religious attractions. There is also extremely beautiful nature around.

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Unfortunately, part of the temple is under construction, therefore I had no chance to see it full beauty.

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Photo 437

Also in Kamakura there is Big Buddha from Kamakura Daibutsu. The second of three biggest Buddha statues in Japan (just before the day of my visit, there was Buddha Birth day celebration, which is really very wide celebrated event, unfortunately the weather was not good enough). The bronze statue is about 13 meters high and 121 tonnes weight.

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Kamakura is located on a seaside, thus in clear weather it’s possible to see mount Fuji. Unfortunately during my visit the weather was not clear enough and I was not able to see it. Though I did see a Japanese school students excursion (or sport lessons?) on a seaside.

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Photo 439

Nearby you can find two more quite important Buddhist temples: Engaku-ji (one of the most important temples for Zen Buddhists) and Hachimangu (this one still working).

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In general, temples are similar to each other, though every one of them has its own special detail
For example in Hachimangu no fee is required for visit the temple, unlike Engaku-ji. However it is possible to buy a special wooden souvenir and write a pray on it.
It works only on people honesty. Souvenirs are just available on the table and you have to put the coin nearby on your own. So you put the coin, take the souvenir, write something on it. Theoretically one can simply skip the step with the coin. Nobody tracks it. Japanese are extremely honest here. And now only here. People do not afraid to leave things unattended. Bud driver can easily leave the bus with engine on. Nothing unusual here.

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